Orphe smart shoes.Asics debuts a prototype smart shoe at CES (updated)

 

Orphe smart shoes.Do Orphe Smart Shoes Really Work?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Just added to your cart.LED smart shoes turn your dance into a light show – CNET

 

Mar 17,  · LED smart shoes turn your dance into a light show. “Orphe’s lights can be set to change along with the speed and orientation of a dancer’s movements, allowing . Mar 13,  · Meet the Orphe: a smart shoe system with motion sensors and LEDs to allow artists and performers to better express themselves. The sole of each shoe has around full-color, serially-controlled LEDs and a Bluetooth module. These shoes map interactions between your movements, light, and sound and let you share your work with other artists. Official store of smart shoes ORPHE series. Shoes can be exchanged up to once free of charge (excluding some products). We, no new folk studio Inc., are a startup company that develops smart shoes with the mission of “Sensing feet, Changing everything.” We are developing the “ORPHE” series as a platform for smart shoes.

 

Orphe smart shoes.Asics debuts a prototype smart shoe at CES (updated) | Engadget

Mar 19,  · A Japanese startup company no new folk studio has launched an interactive LED shoe that enables dancers, and artists to design lighting patterns from their unique dance moves. Two Japanese models wearing no new folk’s smart LED shoes, Orphe. (All photos courtesy of no new folk) The smart . Mar 13,  · Meet the Orphe: a smart shoe system with motion sensors and LEDs to allow artists and performers to better express themselves. The sole of each shoe has around full-color, serially-controlled LEDs and a Bluetooth module. These shoes map interactions between your movements, light, and sound and let you share your work with other artists. Jul 22,  · ASICS Presents Microcomputer-Equipped Evoride Orphe Running Shoe: Originally previewed at CES , the shoes feature a specialized smart sensor from No New Folk Studios.
 
 
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Orphe: smart-footwear for artists and performers | Indiegogo
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How this Japanese founder created smart LED shoes and is planning to scale it

If you’re seeing this message, that means JavaScript has been disabled on your browser. This is heavily revised from the original transcripts. For the full interview, go here. Most good startups are obvious.

Naturally, that makes it easier for customers to buy. On the other hand, there are startups that are still struggling to find product-market fit. And then, there are products like Orphe , LED-emblazoned, wifi- and social sharing-capable dancing shoes. Yes, it sounds like something you would find on Indiegogo. But when I sat down with Yuya Kikukawa, founder of No New Folk Studio and creator of Orphe, it became clear that this was not some quirky side project or some overfunded crazy hardware startup.

We talked about the original inspiration for the shoes and how it is being used in Japan. We also dove into its technology. Smart means it has a computer inside of the sole, and at the same time, there are about full-color LED lights.

The computer can control each pixel, so the user can change the color through the smartphone application. The idea for this product is combining musical instrument functions and LED shoes. The shoes have nine-axis motion sensors: three accelerometers, three gyroscopes, and three compasses. Our main target customers are dancers and performers. Orphe can react with performance motion like dance steps. Our shoes can send information and their lights can be controlled with a step.

Users can download the lighting pattern from the cloud, but the motion sharing is not open yet. It is an important idea because we are a more open platform now.

For example, we are developing the system to enable sharing of sensor data. In the genre of smart shoes, there are some startups. For example, Under Armor is making smart running shoes that have a sensor in the sole. There are also other competitors.

In graduate school, I majored in industrial art design and studied designing musical interface in a laboratory. At that time, I came across the idea of mixing light and sound in one musical interface.

So, PocoPoco , an instrument, is one example. It is black and box-shaped and it is like a sequencer to make loop music. Just by pushing the buttons, it makes some loop sounds and lights up at the same time. It has a haptic interaction. Haptic means it has a solenoid magnetic power actuator. After the prototype, we made a video about it and it got good feedback from around the world. So, I thought of a product that is good for merchandise. I think there are two ways to solve the problem.

One is creating a more intuitive interaction design. For example, with our shoes, people know how to walk wearing shoes, so the gesture is already learned by the user, and I took advantage of this. Another way is using IoT. My lab idea for PocoPoco was collecting the sensor data from the interface so I can improve the interactions for the musical instrument.

But it was just a lab idea, as it took several hundred years to improve the guitar. I wanted to make the feedback an automatic system to improve the instrument.

It was a very dirty prototype, to be honest. We used Arduino. But the reaction was pretty good. When I made a step, it reacted to it, lit up, and wirelessly sent the information to the computer.

The computer, then, made some sound and visual feedback. After being at the Musical Hack Day in Barcelona, I was seriously thinking about commercializing the musical shoes.

I discussed the idea with Abba Labo incubation for IoT companies , and they decided to help and funded us. It was a challenge putting all the electric parts inside the shoes, as they were all placed outside the shoes in the prototype, so we had to study the mechanism of the shoes. Durability is also the biggest problem. I bought many LED shoes and broke a lot of them, studying the inside of the shoes.

We had to make many, many models through 3D printing and with silicon. We made so many prototype soles. Most of them are engineers—half of the team deals with hardware and the other half deals with software. At first, we concentrated on making a niche product, but my concept is not just about making LED shoes.

The important point is there are inputs and outputs and we provide the open SDK to the developers. So, any developer can do interaction design for the shoes.

After releasing the shoes, a lot of people wanted to collaborate with us, so now, we are developing shoes for the healthcare industry. We are working with medical doctors in creating shoes that can teach people how to improve their walking habits. We also released the SDK on the Unity game library and we built a sample application. Now, we are looking to collaborate to make Dance Dance Revolution.

But people are harsh when you fail. I want to change that atmosphere. People have to be kinder to the challengers.

Maybe the environment here in Japan is very severe to release a mass product. Kikukawa also gave some good advice about when to abandon a hardware startup or any kind of startup. The trick is not to follow your passion. Despite what everyone tells you, simply following your passion is the express lane to failure.

Like most founders, Kikukawa was passionate about his first project, PocoPoco, but he set it aside when user response was only lukewarm. Only when he saw the passionate reaction of potential users to Orphe did he know he was onto something. You might have something that is truly transformational and it might take a while for your customers to get that. Taking things to the next level i. Dedicated machines need to be purchased, custom production lines configured, and a supply chain developed and managed.

So, the best way for them to scale is to license their technology or their entire product to larger companies capable of mass production. They take their inspiration from Akio Morita, the founder of Sony who famously and steadfastly refused all licensing and OEM deals.

Morita insisted that Sony products only be sold under the Sony brand. Read more from this series here. More information here. Tim Romero. Podcaster, four-time startup founder, investor, mentor, author, picker, grinner, lover, sinner.

How this Japanese founder created smart LED shoes and is planning to scale it. A photo of Yuya Kikukawa. Remove this ad space by subscribing. Support independent journalism. Recommended reads Next Prev Startups need crowdtesting more than they think. Singapore-based healthtech firm Claritas acquires teleradiology startup IHV.

The Elon Musk of Singapore looks to engineer the next deep tech unicorn. Community Writer Tim Romero Podcaster, four-time startup founder, investor, mentor, author, picker, grinner, lover, sinner. Latest Jobs. Premium Content. Get the daily lowdown on Asia’s top tech stories We break down the big and messy topics of the day so you’re updated on the most important developments in less than three minutes – for free. Sign up. Support quality journalism and content.

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