3d printed titanium bike.World’s First 3D Printed Bike

 

3d printed titanium bike.3D Printed Titanium Bike Parts

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Popular Stories.3D Printed Titanium Bike Parts – Fathom

 

Dec 22,  · 3D Printed Titanium Bike Parts – Fathom By Laura Russart, Dec 22nd, One of the many benefits of using additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is that it offers the opportunity for mass customization. Feb 14,  · Empire Cycles and Renishaw have teamed up to create the first 3D printed titanium bike and Pinkbike took a first look at the London Bike ted Reading Time: 8 mins. Feb 09,  · They could be about to come down in price, however – two British companies recently teamed up to create the world’s first 3D-printed titanium bike frame. Renishaw, an additive manufacturing firm, Occupation: Managing Editor-North America.

 

3d printed titanium bike.World’s First 3D Printed Bike – Pinkbike

Dec 22,  · 3D Printed Titanium Bike Parts – Fathom By Laura Russart, Dec 22nd, One of the many benefits of using additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is that it offers the opportunity for mass customization. Jan 10,  · Ollie was lucky enough to visit the workshop of legendary frame builder, Tom Sturdy, to check out his latest creation: A custom titanium bike using 3D printed lugs. This frame is an amazing feat of engineering, and it might just be one of the best looking bikes we’ve ever seen. What do . Jan 11,  · This week, we’ve stumbled across more drool-worthy titanium in the form of the Sturdy Cycles Fiadh; a British-made bespoke titanium road bike with 3D-printed fork, stem, cranks and seat-post. Let’s dig a little deeper. Sturdy Cycles Fiadh Titanium Road Bike As pictured, the Sturdy Cycles Titanium road bike weighs a claimed kg.
 
 
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World’s first 3D-printed titanium bicycle frame could lead to cheaper, lighter bikes

When it comes to a high strength-to-weight ratio, titanium is just about the best material out there for manufacturing bicycle frames. Unfortunately, those frames are also quite expensive. They could be about to come down in price, however — two British companies recently teamed up to create the world’s first 3D-printed titanium bike frame. Renishaw, an additive manufacturing firm, joined forces with Empire Cycles to build the one-off titanium MX-6 Evo mountain bike. Empire already offers a production aluminum version of the MX The frame was built using an AM laser melting machine manufactured by Renishaw.

In the build process, a high-power ytterbium fibre laser was used to selectively fuse together particles of a titanium alloy powder.

Layers of those fused-together particles were built up one upon the other, to form the finished sections of the frame. Those sections were then bonded together using an adhesive.

Because titanium has a higher density than aluminum, less of it had to be used if Empire wanted a finished bike that was lighter than the stock model. To make that happen, topological optimization software was used — it structurally assessed computer models of each part of the frame, and determined where less material could be used without negatively affecting strength.

As a result, at a total of 1, grams 3 lb , the finished Evo frame weighs 33 percent less than its aluminum counterpart. When its seatpost bracket was tested, it exceeded the EN mountain bike strength standard by six times. The strength of the frame as a whole is still being tested. So, how could this project lead to cheaper titanium frames? For one thing, in the laser melting process, there’s no waste — all of the titanium alloy powder that isn’t fused to make one frame can be reused in another, plus the topological optimization process ensures that less of it is needed in the first place.

Additionally, no special machining has to be created or set up for specific frame designs, which would be the case with cast metal. It should also be relatively simple to tweak frame designs as needed, or to add custom features to individual frames. And finally, it shouldn’t be any more difficult to create components with complex shapes than those that are relatively basic. Source: Renishaw via Stuff. LOG IN. Menu HOME.

Search Query Submit Search. By Ben Coxworth. Facebook Twitter Flipboard LinkedIn. The MX-6 Evo mountain bike, sporting its 3D-printed titanium frame. View 4 Images. The components of the seatpost bracket were printed together on one build platform.

The steps in the MX-6 Evo’s build process. Ben Coxworth. An experienced freelance writer, he previously obtained an English BA from the University of Saskatchewan, then spent over 20 years working in various markets as a television reporter, producer and news videographer. Ben is particularly interested in scientific innovation, human-powered transportation, and the marine environment. Popular Stories. Load More. Sign in to post a comment. Please keep comments to less than words.

No abusive material or spam will be published. Slowburn February 9, PM. If you can laser weld powder into solid mettle why cant you laser weld two pieces of solid mettle together even if you need a little powder to help? Danny Rose February 9, PM. Gadgeteer February 10, AM. Slowburn, Direct metal laser sintering fuses a thin layer of powder at a time.

Each layer is in the order of microns thick. It doesn’t produce enough energy to penetrate deep into a part, which would also risk heat distortion. If you want to weld titanium parts, you’ll have to rely on good, old fashioned TIG welding, which is too risky with a frame like this that’s been lightened as much as possible.

Mark Penver February 10, AM. I suggest the Author reads about laser sintering titanium and the costs. Robert Craven February 10, PM. Be careful on you phrasing of cause and effect. Lead is also denser than aluminum but it wouldn’t make a great bike frame.

Titanium is stronger than aluminum might be a better phrase. Bruce H. Anderson February 10, PM. The other thing to consider is bed size on the 3D printer. To do an entire frame in one piece would need a bed at least one yard or meter square. The picture looks like several parts were made concurrenlty on a bed that might be 8″x8″. Still, quite the accomplishment. And like the recently done elsewhere, quite the price tag I bet. Brainfarth February 10, PM.

Given the size of the bed that would be needed for printing and the inefficiencies that would go along with printing a whole frame, pieces are the key. And even though I have welded Ti quite a bit, the socketed route is the way to go. You only have to glue the pieces together. Where as the TIG welding of them would require a special jig, argon purging of the frame, specialized welding cups and skilled labor.

Although the article says there is no wast, It appears to me that there is some wasted material. The base and the “sprue” sections in the photo appear to be titanium which would be separated and become scrap. That would result in an extremely durable final assembly. Brainfarth has it right: creating the connecting pieces is where 3d printing works best. Once you have those joints it’s easy to finish the bike with mass produced tubes. Be interesting to see case studies in extreme environments.

Asphalt areas in the southwest U. The far north gets very cold too. Not to mention stress testing in extreme freestyle, downhill mtn biking, ect A very competent testing evaluation should be very interesting.